Social Media Prediction: Video Is Going to Be Bigger Than Ever This Year

This setup is all pro-sumer level gear I came across this article today titled Social Media Prediction: Video Is Going to Be Bigger Than Ever This Year. I couldn’t agree more. If you been reading my blog you know I’m a video guy and I believe in the power of video. It’s exciting times for video.  Today’s technologies make video a great way to reach your audience. Web distribution for video is extremely accessible through channels like YouTube or Vimeo.  All of the social media tools handle video very well so making your video seen is pretty simple.  I have helped a lot of companies implement video into their learning and it has seen a great deal of success.

One aspect of video that is often overlooked is the fact that you can make one piece of content that will work on all platforms and devices.  It follows the old adage will once and deploy many. Video brings big value.

Okay I’ve heard it said the video is not interactive, I beg to differ. There is lots of ways the video can be used for interactivity. One really simple example is when used in conjunction with social media. The video can stimulate conversations, create questions and can be extremely provocative.

My conversation with Shay Howe of Groupon

My conversation with Shay Howe of Groupon

I have also use video as components of classroom training, or e-learning as part of an interaction. For example, show a video and ask for a reaction to the video such as make a choice. I.e. did the salesperson in this video interact with the customer correctly?  Then, based on their interaction show another video as feedback.

Still I think there are some tricks to doing great video that require practice and skills not all organizations have.  But that’s why I’m here to help you get there!

Below is the article that inspired this post.

Social Media Prediction: Video Is Going to Be Bigger Than Ever This Year | Video | Entrepreneur.com.

7 things small business should read before making a video

Found this article this morning and I will have to agree, so I thought I would share. Video is so powerful and much more feasible today than even ten years ago. Costs have come way down and it is much easier to distribute or share with your audience. I believe in the power of video. Especially for learning. It can act as stand-a-lone or part of an eLearning, it can be shared in classroom training to break up the the day and improve engagement. Video can also be extremely powerful when combined with mobile.  We have seen the rise of video though social media and its power with portals like Youtube. Video can be interactive as well. For example watch a video and make a choice based on what the video showed you.  I have helped many organizations take the first steps into adding video into their learning and development. It can be easier than you think, especially with a little  help and some mojo 🙂

7 things small business should read before making a video- San Diego Video Production Company.

Self Directed Learning on The Fly

The Kalama River with my Dad, Bother and my friend Steve

The Kalama River with my Dad, Bother and my friend Steve

I have been a Fly Fisherman for several years now. I hesitate to say I am self taught but you could say my learning was self directed. I used a combination of informal, social, short format content and good research or reference. Now I know this method is not something all that special or even new. I do believe that there are a lot more resources available to us today that make this method much easier. I would like to offer my approach and technique as an example of how someone can learn any new skill. These techniques will work for professional development within an organization as well as for personal interest skills development. The keys for success are first identifying the skills you want to learn, set some goals and structure to keep you on track and to assure you are moving forward.

I recently discovered that I had a Hernia and needed to have surgery. Ouch! I pause for a short pity party. 😉 The main point here is that I knew I would have some down time. This is something I am normally not too good at. I knew I needed to plan something to do so I would not go stir crazy or even worse drive my family crazy. I was looking at several days of very minimal activity then light activity as I could handle but no working out for about a month. Basically I would be putzing around the house days for weeks. That said, I am not a big TV person. I do like movies but I usually can’t even make it through most movies without having to go to the kitchen or something. I am just not great at passive entertainment, I need to be doing something. I decided that this would be a good time to start learning to tie my own flies.

Where to start? Where else? For me most things start with a Google search. Research is the most important step in self directed learning. You know the old saying you don’t know what you don’t know. You need to build a foundation of understanding so you can put together plan. Fist I would need to know what equipment is needed. I found several Fly Tying kits. By looking at the kits I knew what the basic tools I would need. Further research on YouTube would give me some reviews on the tools and how to use them. There where lots of places to buy online but I decided that finding someone at local Fly Fishing shop to help me make the right purchases would be more valuable than saving a few dollars.

I jumped in the Jeep and headed down to my favorite local fly show Pacific Fly Fishers. I asked owner Michael Bennett help me pick out the basic tools I needed to get started. I then asked him to help me choose two of the most common flies that would work well for the areas I like to fish and the materials I would need to tie them.

My Workstation with Fly Tying setup

My Workstation with Fly Tying setup

My next step was to get my brain around some of the basic techniques so I went on a YouTube marathon. There are many videos on how to use the tools and the various techniques to uses them. I then picked some common flies I have used and watched those videos. I must have watched dozens of them before I tried any myself. I also had been given a book several years back call Beginner’s Guide to Fly-tying and I also spent a great deal of time piling through it.

Ok I was ready to take the plunge. I decided it was time to tye my first fly. I choose the Black Wooly Bugger. It is a fly I have fished many a times so I was excited to have an endless supply. The YouTube video below walked be through the steps to tying the fly and because I had spent so much time researching and studying other videos it was a breeze. I have since then tied several of the same flies and each time I tie it the fly looks better.

In summery I think this is the new model for learning. Even formal education can borrow form this approach. Especially when you consider the flipped classroom. The amount of information and instructional content that is available to us these days I unbelievable. There are so many things I have turned to YouTube videos to learn how to do. From fixing something around the house, installing a part on my Jeep or learning a new software. Now just don’t take my word for it. If you are like most people there is something that you have always wanted to know how to do. Go ahead, do it! Take advantage of the resources available to you and learn that new skill.

Steps:

  • Research
  • Talk to people who have the skill
  • Understand and get the tools needed
  • Review demonstrations
  • Follow step by step videos/instructions
  • Repeat or practice, practice, practice
  • Get feedback and test

Some great thought leader interviews to come from DevLearn 2012

My conversation with Shay Howe of Groupon

My conversation with Shay Howe of Groupon

These are exciting times in the learning and development space. We are in a huge technology growth period right now. Technologies like mobile, cloud and the adaptation of social & informal learning for the enterprise are at the core of the opportunities in front of us. I think most of us would agree that these technologies are disruptive or at least they should be. It is true that not all organizations adapt new technologies at the same time. My friend Dr. Gary Woodill owner of i5 Research and the author of The Mobile Learning Edge illustrates this in his technology life-cycle curve. DevLearn has always been a great place to learn and have conversations about the edge of learning. It is also a great event to learn how early adopters are actually leveraging these new technologies and learn from them. I have identified several thought leaders who are talking about what is really happening in learning today to interview.

I am looking forward to sitting down at talking with these experts and sharing them with you as I always do. One of these really smart people is Brent Schlenker an expert in learning technology. Here is a Guild video by Brent on Designing For All Technologies.


Here is a partial list of the interviews I am conducting this year at DevLearn.

Keep an eye out for these great conversations and blog posts from DevLearn 2012

Related Articles:

Blogging vs Threaded Discussions in Online Courses | Connected Principals

I ran across this post and I think it is an important conversation. In the 90’s I worked at a start-up called FreeEigo.com a site that taught English to a Japanese audience. We created a community where students and instructors could interact with each other. It was a personal connection and created a bridge between student and teacher. This is an important aspect of distance learning. It also benefits corporate learning, it creates a place to connect with top performers with new employees. It is also a place for front line employees to connect with leadership. This builds a sense of community so people feel more connected to the organization. All of this is extremely important you have a distributed work force.

Blogging vs Threaded Discussions in Online Courses | Connected Principals.

Innovation is about taking risks!

“Doing the same thing over and over, yet expecting different results, is the definition of crazy.” ~ Unknown

I am looking forward to my presentation on innovation this October 16 for the ASTD Puget Sound chapter. It has been inspiring doing research for my presentation. I thought I get the conversation going with a few quotes and an inspirational TEDx video.

Innovation as defined by Wikipedia

“…the creation of better or more effective products, processes, services, technologies, or ideas that are readily available”

I like this TEDxBerkely with Carl Bass the president and chief executive officer of Autodesk, Inc. His presentation is titled The New Rules of Innovation

“Innovation is about making things better in significant and hopefully meaningful ways”

Here is a fun article I found in The New York Times.

32 Innovations That Will Change your Tomorrow

Social Experiance with Heart

Last night my wife April and I went to see the band Heart. As always it was a great show. These girls ROCK. Heart has recorded so many great song and they always play at least one Led Zeppelin song. (my other favorite band)  I am pretty sure most of you could sing a long with at least one of Hearts many hits. I have been to a ton of rock concerts in my life and not everybody sounds as good live as the do on vinyl or what ever you choice of media is. Yes I am one of “those”.  We have attended quite a few Heart concerts, pretty much every Seattle show. We are members of their fan club “Heart Mongers” that way we get to buy tickets before the general population. There is a very active forum on the site and people share stories and debate which songs are the best etc. (social point #1) Last night we 5th row center, perfect seats. (bragging here)

OK now to my real point here. As I was bouncing up and down snapping photos on my iPhone and posting them on Facebook, I though of something. I became very aware of how many people where doing the same thing. In the 70’s & 80’s people would be holding up their lighters. They did not allow even allow cameras. OK here is my point. This was not just a rock concert for a few thousand people it was a social event a shared experience. People were bringing their social network along with them. Posting photos, making comments, tagging friends that came with them. It does not stop there. Here is where the magic happens. Their social network was responding back by joining in. They where making comments, liking or even sharing out to their networks. Not only were we enjoying a concert, we were also having a social experience with all of our friends and family. ❤

Tappestry a new social learning tool by Float Mobile Learning

Recently Float launched a new app for social learning. The app is called Tappestry. It hit app store just in time to be a center point of the conversation at mLearnCon 2012. Tappestry is the first true mobile first app to hit the market but it is also the first application based on the next iteration of SCORM called Project Tin Can. If you don’t know what that is you should take a look at the interviews I did with Aaron Silvers and Tim Martin. Or this interview with Ali Shahrazad and Russell Duhon of Saltbox.
I am very proud that I work with such a creative company with some very talented people. If you would like to know more about Tappestry David Kelly does a great job in his blog titled Exploring Tappestry.
Or you can also jump right in and download the app for free and start sharing what you learn. Download